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Summer Reading List

It's somehow nearly the middle of August and as I've just completed my PD/Additional Qualification courses for the summer, I'm ready to turn to my stack of summer reading books! Here's what I'm reading this summer.


Please note, this is not an advertisement and I have received no money or compensation for this post.

  1. The Vanishing Half: A Novel by Brit Bennet "The Vignes twin sisters will always be identical. But after growing up together in a small, southern black community and running away at age sixteen, it''s not just the shape of their daily lives that is different as adults, it''s everything: their families, their communities, their racial identities. Many years later, one sister lives with her black daughter in the same southern town she once tried to escape. The other secretly passes for white, and her white husband knows nothing of her past. Still, even separated by so many miles and just as many lies, the fates of the twins remain intertwined. What will happen to the next generation, when their own daughters'' storylines intersect?" (Source)

  2. This Book is Anti-Racist: 20 Lessons On How To Wake Up, Take Action, And Do The Work by Tiffany Jewell "Gain a deeper understanding of your anti-racist self as you progress through 20 chapters that spark introspection, reveal the origins of racism that we are still experiencing, and give you the courage and power to undo it. Each lesson builds on the previous one as you learn more about yourself and racial oppression. An activity at the end of every chapter gets you thinking and helps you grow with the knowledge. All you need is a pen and paper." (Source) I got a head start on reading this one because I was so excited and it is excellent - especially if you're a beginner on the subject and want to learn more about what anti-racism is and reflect on your own practices.

  3. Fifteen Hundred Miles from the Sun: A Novel by Jonny Garza Villa "Julián Luna has a plan for his life: Graduate. Get into UCLA. And have the chance to move away from Corpus Christi, Texas, and the suffocating expectations of others that have forced Jules into an inauthentic life. Then in one reckless moment, with one impulsive tweet, his plans for a low-key nine months are thrown―literally―out the closet. The downside: the whole world knows, and Jules has to prepare for rejection. The upside: Jules now has the opportunity to be his real self." (Source)

  4. The Skin We're In: A Year Of Black Resistance And Power by Desmond Cole "In his 2015 cover story for Toronto Life magazine, Desmond Cole exposed the racist actions of the Toronto police force, detailing the dozens of times he had been stopped and interrogated under the controversial practice of carding. The story quickly came to national prominence, shaking the country to its core and catapulting its author into the public sphere. Cole used his newfound profile to draw insistent, unyielding attention to the injustices faced by Black Canadians on a daily basis. Both Cole’s activism and journalism find vibrant expression in his first book, The Skin We’re In. Puncturing the bubble of Canadian smugness and naive assumptions of a post-racial nation, Cole chronicles just one year—2017—in the struggle against racism in this country. It was a year that saw calls for tighter borders when Black refugees braved frigid temperatures to cross into Manitoba from the States, Indigenous land and water protectors resisting the celebration of Canada’s 150th birthday, police across the country rallying around an officer accused of murder, and more." (Source)

  5. Ella Minnow Pea: A Novel in Letters by Mark Dunn "Ella Minnow Pea is a girl living happily on the fictional island of Nollop off the coast of South Carolina. Nollop was named after Nevin Nollop, author of the immortal phrase containing all the letters of the alphabet, “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.” Now Ella finds herself acting to save her friends, family, and fellow citizens from the encroaching totalitarianism of the island’s Council, which has banned the use of certain letters of the alphabet as they fall from a memorial statue of Nevin Nollop. As the letters progressively drop from the statue they also disappear from the novel." (Source)


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